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How to take care older pets
25 June 2024
How to Take Care of Older Pets?
Here are more basic considerations when caring for older pets: Vaccinations: Your pet's vaccination needs may change with age. Talk to your veterinarian about a vaccination protocol that is appropriate for your geriatric pet. Mental health: Pets can show signs of senility.  Engaging them in interactive play helps keep their mental capacity sharp, just as in people.  Changes in behaviour, even subtle ones, can be a sign that your pet is experiencing cognitive dysfunction.  Make sure to discuss any concerns with your veterinarian.   Environmental Considerations: Older pets often need changes in their environment to help cope with changes in mobility.  For example, older cats may need to have their food bowls moved to the floor rather than the counter, and dogs may need to have their dog beds moved downstairs if they are having trouble climbing the stairs.    Dental Care: Dental health is a very important part of your pet’s overall health. Your pet’s teeth and gums should be checked at least once a year by your veterinarian to look for early signs of a problem and to keep your pet’s mouth healthy.   As your pet heads into their senior years, your relationship will continue to grow and mature.  With proper care and attention, your pet can have a good quality of life and enjoy sharing your life for more years.   If your pets are in an emergency or if you have general inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact Veterinary Emergency Centre (VEC).   General Hotline: 2334-2334 24-Hour Emergency Hotline: 6828-6620

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2 April 2024
Recognizing Chronic Arthritic Pain in Older Cat
As loving pet parents, it's our duty to ensure the well-being and comfort of our feline companions, especially as they gracefully age. One common condition that often goes unnoticed in older cats is chronic arthritic pain. Just like humans, cats can suffer from joint issues that can significantly impact their quality of life. Here are some important signs to watch out for and steps you can take to help your furry friend feel their best.   Subtle Changes in Behaviour: Cats are masters at hiding discomfort, but subtle changes in behaviour can be telling signs of chronic pain. Keep an eye out for decreased activity levels, reluctance to jump or climb, and changes in grooming habits. Your once sprightly cat may become less inclined to chase toys or may hesitate before jumping onto their favourite cat-tree.   Altered Gait and Mobility: Arthritis can affect a cat's gait and mobility, leading to stiffness and difficulty in movement, particularly after periods of rest. You might notice your cat taking shorter strides or favoring one leg over another. They may also have trouble using the litter box or accessing their usual spots around the house.   Changes in Appetite and Weight Loss: Chronic pain can impact a cat's appetite and overall demeanor. Keep an eye on their eating habits and weight. Cats experiencing arthritic pain may show a decreased interest in food or may have difficulty reaching their bowls comfortably, leading to weight loss over time.   Increased Irritability or Aggression: Cats in pain may exhibit increased irritability or aggression, especially when touched in sensitive areas or approached abruptly. If your usually docile cat becomes more vocal or defensive when handled, it could be a sign that they're experiencing discomfort.   Seek Veterinary Care: If you notice any of these signs or suspect that your cat may be experiencing chronic arthritic pain, it's essential to consult with your veterinarian. They can perform a thorough examination, including X-rays if necessary, to assess the extent of the arthritis and develop a treatment plan tailored to your cat's needs.   Treatment Options: There are various treatment options available to help manage chronic arthritic pain in cats. Your veterinarian may recommend dietary supplements, such as glucosamine and chondroitin, to support joint health. They may also prescribe pain medications or anti-inflammatory drugs to alleviate discomfort and improve mobility.   Provide Comfort and Support: Make adjustments around the house to accommodate your cat's needs. Provide soft bedding in warm, quiet areas where they can rest comfortably. Consider adding ramps or steps to help them access their favorite perches or beds without exerting excess strain on their joints.   Gentle Exercise and Physical Therapy: Encourage gentle exercise and play to help keep your cat's joints limber and maintain muscle strength. Interactive toys and games that encourage movement can be beneficial, but always be mindful of your cat's limitations and avoid activities that may cause undue stress or discomfort.   By staying vigilant and proactive in recognizing the signs of chronic arthritic pain in older cats, you can help ensure that your beloved feline friend enjoys a comfortable and fulfilling life well into their golden years. Remember, your veterinarian is your best ally in providing the care and support your cat needs to thrive. Together, we can make a positive difference in the lives of our cherished companions.    ☎️ If you would like to know more about Senior Cat Wellness Plan or if you have general inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact Veterinary Emergency Centre (VEC).General Hotline: 2334-233424-Hour Emergency Hotline: 6828-6620

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Post 10 - Signs of Illness in your pets -  30 Apr 2022
8 November 2023
Signs of Illness in Your Pets
Dogs and cats are excellent at pretending everything is fine, even when they are sick. The signs of illness are often very subtle, so you have to watch them closely. If you do notice anything abnormal, don’t rely on books or websites for a diagnosis. Contact your vet immediately.   Symptoms to watch for Diarrhea Repeated vomiting Refusal to eat over 24 hours Excessive thirst and urination Red or swollen gums Difficulty urinating - IF YOUR PET CANNOT URINATE, THAT IS AN EMERGENCY! Runny nose and eyes Itchy skin Progressive weight loss Tiredness
   Frequent veterinary appointments and close monitoring at home can help detect diseases in their earlier stages, when they are the most treatable. For enquiries or bookings, please do not hesitate to contact VEC at 2334-2334.

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Post 9- Common heart diseases in cats -  28 Sep 2022
1 November 2023
Common heart diseases in cats
A cat is not a small dog. Common heart diseases in cats are different in dogs. We already knew common acquired heart disease in dogs in the previous topic. They are degenerative and progressive diseases. Although the common acquired heart disease in cats are progressive, the nature of the development of the disease is slightly different than in dogs. The most common acquired heart disease in cats is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). HCM is a genetic disease and causes the muscular wall of a heart to thicken, decreasing the heart’s efficacy and sometimes creating symptoms, like spiritless, decreased appetite, and open mouth breathing. The condition are more prevalent in certain breeds (including British Shorthair, Maine Coon, Exotic Shorthair, and Ragdoll).   The rate of increasing thickness of heart muscle may vary considerably and the onset time of muscle getting thickened is also different in each cat. For example, some cats may have normal left ventricle for a period of time and then suddenly become very thickened in 1 day. Others may have mild thickened left ventricle and never getting more thickened for many years. HCM can affect cats of all ages. Proper diagnosis and treatment can decrease the chance that a cat with HCM experiencing certain symptoms and can improve his or her quality of life.   The left ventricle is thickened in a cat with HCM, leading to a decrease in the volume of the heart chamber and to abnormal relaxation of the heart muscle. These changes cause increased oxygen usage and possibly to oxygen starvation of the heart muscle. This oxygen starvation may cause heart cells to die, worsening heart function and even the development of arrhythmia. In addition to these changes, less efficient blood pumping may result in congestive heart failure or/and the formation of blood clots in the heart.   Clinical signs of congestive heart failure are labored or rapid breathing, open mouth breathing, and lethargy. A serious and potentially life threatening consequence of HCM is the formation of blood clots in the heart. These blood clots may travel through the bloodstream and obstructs flow in other parts of the body. The effect of the clot depends on its location. In cats with HCM, clots most commonly result in blockage of blood flow to the hind limbs, causing acute hind limb pain and even hind limb paralysis. Although relatively rare, cats with HCM are at risk for sudden death. Diagnosing and treating the HCM properly can help decrease severity of the signs and may decrease the likelihood of blood clots.   The most commonly diagnosed congenital heart disease in cats are ventricular septal defect (VSD), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), and mitral valve dysplasia (MVD). The pathophysiology of MVD is similar as MMVD in dogs but it’s the problem since birth. PDA in cats is as same as in dogs. VSD is a hole in the ventricular septum. The septum is a muscular tissue that separates the left and right ventricle and prevents blood being diverted from one chamber to the other. The severity of VSD depends on the size of the hole. A small VSD is commonly of no significance, and an affected kitten can be expected to live a normal life. A moderate or larger hole, may cause enough shunting of blood to produce clinical signs, such as rapid breathing and exercise intolerance.   If your pets are in an emergency or if you have general inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact Veterinary Emergency Centre (VEC). General Hotline: 2334-2334 24-Hour Emergency Hotline: 6282-8179

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12 June 2023
Pain in Old Cats
Many illnesses can cause daily pain in cats, such as dental disease, arthritis, kidney disease and others. - Over 50% of cats have dental disease. - Over 90% of cats above 12 years old have osteoarthritis. - 30% of cats above 10 years old have kidney disease.   Cats naturally HIDE signs of pain, so how can I know if my pet is suffering? 1. Has your cat stopped jumping up onto the bed or sofa? 2. Seems less playful or sleeping more? More grumpy or vocal than before? 3. Eating less or prefers only soft food now? Drinking more? 4. Running away from the grooming brush? Grooming themselves less/letting hair get matted? Or overgrooming a certain area (such as groin or hip). 5. Using the litter tray less often?   These could all be signs of chronic pain. If you’re worried your pet is suffering from chronic pain, then vet can help check your pet for signs of illness.   VEC is launching [Senior Cat / Dog Wellness Plan (age 7+)] for owners to know more your pet’s health. For more details please call 2334-2334. General Hotline: 2334-2334 24-Hour Emergency Hotline: 6282-8179 & 6828-6620

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5 April 2023
Senior Cat Wellness Testing
Wellness testing includes blood tests and other diagnostic tests that can detect early disease in senior pets that appear healthy and have no obvious clinical signs.   Illness and diseases can be masked in the early stage of disease in cats. If a disease can be detected early on, steps can be taken to slow down the progression of the disease. Wellness testing is important in senior cats that are over 7 years old as they have a higher chance of developing chronic disease.   Wellness testing can be performed during your cat’s annual visit to the veterinarian for physical examination and vaccination.   Tests that can be included for wellness testing for older cats include complete blood count (CBC), biochemistry profile, urinalysis, thyroid hormone testing, blood pressure and early kidney function test (SDMA). It is recommended to do more comprehensive testing for older cats as they have a higher risk of underlying disease.   Complete Blood Count (CBC) gives information about the red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets number. It can test for anemia (decrease red blood cell), infection (increase white blood test) and clotting problem (decrease in platelet number).   Biochemistry profile helps to detect diseases such as diabetes, kidney and liver disease. If abnormalities are detected, more diagnostic tests such as radiographs and ultrasounds will be recommended. Blood pressure monitoring can detect an increase in blood pressure which is common in older cats.   SDMA tests for early kidney function loss as early as 25% loss of function. Urinalysis tests for kidney function and if there is any diabetes or infection present. Kidney function test and urinalysis allow a more complete assessment of kidney function which is important as there is higher chance of kidney disease in older animals.   Thyroid problems are also common in older cats. Thyroid hormone testing gives information about the thyroid hormone level in the blood. Cats usually suffer from hyperthyroidism (high levels of thyroid hormone).   Wellness testing is a straightforward way of monitoring your older cat’s health. Early detection of disease can lead to early treatment and delay in the progression of disease and to ensure your pet will have a healthy and active life.   VEC is launching [Senior Cat Wellness Plan (age 7+)] for owners to know more your pet’s health. For more details please call 2334-2334. General Hotline: 2334-2334 24-Hour Emergency Hotline: 6282-8179

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General Hotline: 2334-2334

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