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2 April 2024
Recognizing Chronic Arthritic Pain in Older Cat
As loving pet parents, it's our duty to ensure the well-being and comfort of our feline companions, especially as they gracefully age. One common condition that often goes unnoticed in older cats is chronic arthritic pain. Just like humans, cats can suffer from joint issues that can significantly impact their quality of life. Here are some important signs to watch out for and steps you can take to help your furry friend feel their best.   Subtle Changes in Behaviour: Cats are masters at hiding discomfort, but subtle changes in behaviour can be telling signs of chronic pain. Keep an eye out for decreased activity levels, reluctance to jump or climb, and changes in grooming habits. Your once sprightly cat may become less inclined to chase toys or may hesitate before jumping onto their favourite cat-tree.   Altered Gait and Mobility: Arthritis can affect a cat's gait and mobility, leading to stiffness and difficulty in movement, particularly after periods of rest. You might notice your cat taking shorter strides or favoring one leg over another. They may also have trouble using the litter box or accessing their usual spots around the house.   Changes in Appetite and Weight Loss: Chronic pain can impact a cat's appetite and overall demeanor. Keep an eye on their eating habits and weight. Cats experiencing arthritic pain may show a decreased interest in food or may have difficulty reaching their bowls comfortably, leading to weight loss over time.   Increased Irritability or Aggression: Cats in pain may exhibit increased irritability or aggression, especially when touched in sensitive areas or approached abruptly. If your usually docile cat becomes more vocal or defensive when handled, it could be a sign that they're experiencing discomfort.   Seek Veterinary Care: If you notice any of these signs or suspect that your cat may be experiencing chronic arthritic pain, it's essential to consult with your veterinarian. They can perform a thorough examination, including X-rays if necessary, to assess the extent of the arthritis and develop a treatment plan tailored to your cat's needs.   Treatment Options: There are various treatment options available to help manage chronic arthritic pain in cats. Your veterinarian may recommend dietary supplements, such as glucosamine and chondroitin, to support joint health. They may also prescribe pain medications or anti-inflammatory drugs to alleviate discomfort and improve mobility.   Provide Comfort and Support: Make adjustments around the house to accommodate your cat's needs. Provide soft bedding in warm, quiet areas where they can rest comfortably. Consider adding ramps or steps to help them access their favorite perches or beds without exerting excess strain on their joints.   Gentle Exercise and Physical Therapy: Encourage gentle exercise and play to help keep your cat's joints limber and maintain muscle strength. Interactive toys and games that encourage movement can be beneficial, but always be mindful of your cat's limitations and avoid activities that may cause undue stress or discomfort.   By staying vigilant and proactive in recognizing the signs of chronic arthritic pain in older cats, you can help ensure that your beloved feline friend enjoys a comfortable and fulfilling life well into their golden years. Remember, your veterinarian is your best ally in providing the care and support your cat needs to thrive. Together, we can make a positive difference in the lives of our cherished companions.    ☎️ If you would like to know more about Senior Cat Wellness Plan or if you have general inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact Veterinary Emergency Centre (VEC).General Hotline: 2334-233424-Hour Emergency Hotline: 6828-6620

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Dog Skin #8
5 January 2024
An Overview of Skin Problem in Dogs
Is your dog constantly scratching, experiencing redness of the skin, and even emitting some unusual odors? These could be signs that your dog is suffering from a skin disease. Canine skin diseases are common health issues. Understanding the common symptoms, types, causes, prevention, treatment, and dietary recommendations for dog skin diseases can help protect the health of our furry friends. We will provide a detailed introduction to the relevant knowledge of dog skin diseases to help dog owners better understand how to prevent and manage this issue.   Common Symptoms of Dog Skin Diseases   Dogs with skin diseases often exhibit the following common symptoms: Itching: Dogs will continuously scratch the affected areas of their skin with their teeth and claws to alleviate itchiness. This may manifest as repetitive scratching or rubbing against the floor and furniture. Skin redness or inflammation: When the skin is affected by a disease, it may become red, inflamed, and sometimes the skin can break or bleed due to intense scratching, leading to ulcers. Hair loss: Areas of a dog's skin affected by a skin disease may experience hair loss, with the hair becoming thin or falling out in certain areas. Unusual odor: Skin diseases in dogs can cause the emission of an unusual odor, which may be caused by bacteria or fungi adhering to the skin.   Common Types of Dog Skin Diseases   There are several types of canine skin diseases, including interdigital dermatitis, atopic dermatitis (allergic dermatitis), and seborrheic dermatitis. Here is a brief overview of these common dog skin diseases:   Interdigital Dermatitis: Interdigital dermatitis refers to inflammation and infection between a dog's toes. This condition is typically characterized by redness, swelling, pain, and itching in the interdigital area. Dogs may constantly scratch or bite the affected areas, and in some cases, interdigital dermatitis may be accompanied by skin bleeding and odor. Atopic Dermatitis: Atopic dermatitis is an allergic skin disease commonly seen in dogs with specific allergies to certain substances or environmental factors. Symptoms include redness, itching and ulcer formation. Dogs may constantly bite and scratch the affected areas, especially the abdomen, paws, ears, and face. The skin may show red patches, rashes, and eczema, and there may be hair loss and an unusual odor. Seborrheic Dermatitis: Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin disease often caused by excessive sebum production or bacterial infection. The dog's skin may become greasy, flaky, and emit an odor. Symptoms also include skin redness and itching. In some cases, the dog's skin may become greasy, dull, and prone to matting. Folliculitis: Folliculitis refers to the infection and inflammation of hair follicles. This condition is commonly seen in hairy areas of dogs such as the back, neck, and buttocks. Dogs with folliculitis may experience skin redness and pain. Folliculitis can also lead to hair loss, shedding, and skin infections.   Causes of Dog Skin Diseases   Dog skin diseases can have various causes. Here are some common causes:   Parasite Bites: Skin diseases in dogs can be caused by bites from external parasites such as fleas, lice, or mites. These parasites can cause skin redness, itching, and inflammatory reactions. Dogs may continuously scratch the affected areas, further damaging the skin and even causing infections. Bacterial/Fungal Infections: Bacterial or fungal infections are also common causes of dog skin diseases. These microorganisms can enter the dog's skin, causing infection and inflammation. Common infections include Staphylococcus, fungi, and yeast. Infections typically cause skin redness, itching and odor. Overcleaning: Overcleaning can also contribute to skin problems in dogs. When owners excessively use bathing products to clean their dogs' skin, it may disrupt the natural balance and protective barrier of the skin, leading to dryness, sensitivity, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. Allergic reactions: Dogs may experience allergic reactions to certain substances in their environment, such as pollen, dust mites, food, or household cleaners. These allergic reactions can cause symptoms such as skin redness, swelling, itching, and scratching. Prevention of Dog Skin Diseases   To prevent dog skin diseases, the following measures can be taken:   Parasite control: Regular use of parasite control products can effectively prevent bites and infections from external parasites such as fleas, ticks, and mites, protecting dogs from infestations for a certain period. Environmental cleanliness: Regularly clean your dog's bedding, toys, and surrounding environment to reduce the growth of bacteria, mold, and parasites. Ensure that the dog's living environment is dry, well-ventilated, and free from moisture and unsanitary conditions. Bathing: Bathing can help remove dirt, bacteria, and allergens from the dog's skin surface, reducing the risk of infection and allergies. When bathing your dog, choose appropriate bathing products specifically made for dogs and avoid excessive cleaning and the use of harsh chemicals. Additionally, regular brushing can help remove dead skin cells, dandruff, and mats, promoting good blood circulation and hair health.   If your dog shows symptoms of a skin disease, it is important to consult a veterinarian as soon as possible. The veterinarian will perform an examination, diagnose the cause, and develop an appropriate treatment plan.  

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Cat FIV #6
4 January 2024
FIV in Cats: Daily care and Prevention
Feline AIDS, also known as FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus), is a special immune disease in cats that can pose a serious health crisis for them. However, it does not transmit to humans. Currently, there is no specific treatment for Feline AIDS, so prevention is better than cure. It is important to learn about Feline AIDS and avoid cats to be infected.   What is Feline AIDS? Feline AIDS (FIV) is a feline immunodeficiency virus that attacks the immune system of cats, lowering their immunity and weakening their ability to fight other infections and diseases.   By providing FIV-positive cats with a stress-free environment and proper nutrition, they can live just like any other cats, and their lifespan can be similar to uninfected cats. With appropriate treatment and care, the risk of complications can be effectively reduced.   Common symptoms of Feline AIDS After infection, cats may not show obvious symptoms of Feline AIDS, making it difficult for owners to detect. Typically, as the cat's immune system gradually deteriorates, the following symptoms may occur:   Weight loss Poor appetite Enlarged lymph nodes Skin diseases and ringworm Diarrhea Stomatitis and gingivitis   If your cat displays any of these issues, it is advisable to consult a veterinarian for a detailed diagnosis and treatment. Transmission routes of Feline AIDS The main transmission routes of Feline AIDS are through direct contact of blood or body fluids with wounds, such as bites and scratches. Additionally, FIV-positive mother cats can vertically transmit the virus to their kittens. However, cats generally do not get infected through sexual contact or sharing water bowls and litter boxes. How to test and prevent Feline AIDS? Most veterinary clinics provide rapid screening tests to check the antibody levels in a cat's blood. Additionally, owners can consult with veterinarians to assess whether healthy cats that are not infected with Feline AIDS require vaccination against FIV.   What to do if a cat is infected with Feline AIDS? If a cat is diagnosed with Feline AIDS, how should the owner handle it? FIV-positive cats require special daily care. This includes providing a balanced diet, maintaining a clean environment, regular check-ups, and minimizing contact with other cats as much as possible.   Provide balanced nutrition: High-quality and balanced diet to support the immune system and overall health. Regular check-ups: Regular health check-ups at the veterinary clinic to monitor physical condition and address any health issues early. Indoor living: Keep the cat indoors and prevent them from roaming freely to avoid contact with other infected cats, reducing the risk of virus transmission or disease progression.    

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Feline Panleukopeni #5
4 January 2024
Feline Panleukopenia: Symptoms
Feline Panleukopenia is a highly contagious feline disease and is considered as one of the killers among cats, especially kittens, with a high risk of infection and mortality. Understanding the symptoms, transmission, prevention, and treatment methods of Feline Panleukopenia is crucial for protecting the health of cats.   What is Feline Panleukopenia? Feline Panleukopenia, also known as Feline Distemper, is a highly contagious disease caused by the Feline Panleukopenia Virus. The virus primarily affects the digestive, respiratory, and nervous systems of cats, leading to a weakened immune system and various severe symptoms.   Transmission of Feline Panleukopenia The Feline Panleukopenia Virus can be directly transmitted through contact with infected cat fluids and secretions. This includes contact with the nasal discharge, saliva, tears, urine, and feces of infected cats. Therefore, multi-cat environments such as shelters or breeding facilities pose a particularly high risk.   In addition, the Feline Panleukopenia Virus has a strong ability to survive in the environment and can persist for several months in household and pet environments. Therefore, there is a chance of virus transmission through objects or airborne particles even without direct contact with infected cats.   Symptoms of Feline Panleukopenia Once cats are infected with Feline Panleukopenia, it can cause various symptoms, including: Loss of appetite: A loss of interest in food and leading to a significant decrease in appetite. Respiratory infections: Symptoms such as sneezing, nasal discharge and coughing. Vomiting and diarrhea: Feline Panleukopenia-associated gastrointestinal problems can cause vomiting and diarrhea. The feces may appear watery or bloody. Due to vomiting and diarrhea, cats may experience dehydration symptoms such as thirst, dry mouth, and reduced urine output. Fever: Cats may experience fever symptoms and a weak appearance. Lethargy: Can cause lethargy and even seizures and neurological issues. Anemia: A decrease in red blood cell count, resulting in anemia symptoms such as pale mucous membranes and weakness. These symptoms may vary among different cats and their severity can depend on the level of infection and the cat's immune status. If you suspect a cat may be infected with Feline Panleukopenia, it is important to consult a veterinarian immediately for diagnosis and treatment.   Prevention and Treatment of Feline Panleukopenia The best way to prevent Feline Panleukopenia is through vaccination. The Feline Panleukopenia vaccine is an effective preventive measure that provides cats with immunity against the virus. Vaccination is especially important during the kitten stage and typically begins at around two months of age, with multiple doses administered to ensure full immune protection.   In addition to vaccination, cat owners should also take the following preventive measures: Isolation of new cats: When introducing new cats, they should be isolated for a period of time to ensure they are not carrying any potential Feline Panleukopenia infection. The isolation period is usually two weeks to one month. Environmental cleanliness: Regularly clean and disinfect the environment that cats frequently come into contact with, especially in shelter or multi-cat environments. Use pet-safe disinfectants to clean litter boxes, food and water bowls, and prevent cross-infection. Since there is no specific antiviral treatment for Feline Panleukopenia, veterinarians may use medications and other treatment methods to alleviate symptoms and enhance the cat's immune system's ability to fight the virus. This may include intravenous fluid therapy to provide hydration, prescription antibiotics to fight bacterial infections and alleviate discomfort. Infected cats should be isolated. The outcome of treatment depends on the cat's immune status and level of infection.

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Dog Vaccinations
13 December 2023
Dog Vaccination: Schedule and Types
Getting a dog vaccinated is an important measure for their health protection. These vaccines help prevent various diseases and ensuring dogs can enjoy a healthy life.   Why Should My Dog Be Vaccinated? Newly born puppies have a weak immune system, but vaccinating them can strengthen their immune system by producing antibodies to fight against various diseases. Therefore, vaccinating your dog is a key measure to protect them from disease threats.   Types of Dog Vaccines and Preventable Diseases According to Hong Kong regulations, dogs are required to receive the rabies vaccine. In addition to the rabies vaccine, dogs also need to receive the "DHPPiL" vaccine, often referred to as the "five-in-one" vaccine.   Rabies Vaccine: Dogs and humans are both at risk of contracting rabies, which is a highly fatal disease. Vaccination effectively prevents dogs from getting infected with rabies, protecting both you and your dog's health. DHPPiL Vaccine ("Five-in-One" Vaccine): The DHPPiL vaccine effectively prevents five common dog diseases, including canine distemper, canine parvovirus enteritis, infectious canine hepatitis, canine influenza, and leptospirosis.   Vaccination Schedule for Dogs The timing and frequency of dog vaccinations vary depending on the vaccine type.   DHPPiL Vaccine Puppies should receive their first core vaccine shot at two months old, followed by boosters every month until they are four months old. Afterwards, revaccination is required annually. For adult dogs, the initial core vaccine shot is followed by a booster after one month. After these two shots, revaccination is necessary annually.   Rabies Vaccine Dogs should receive their first rabies vaccine shot at five months old, followed by revaccination every three years.   Daily Preventive Measures for Dog’s Health In addition to vaccination, taking daily preventive measures is crucial for maintaining your dog's health. Here are some common preventive measures:   Annual Health Check: Schedule regular veterinary health check to monitor your dog's overall health, including comprehensive physical examination, dental evaluation and general deworming. Regular Grooming: Regularly groom your dog's fur to remove shed hair and parasites. Clean Environment: Maintain a clean and hygienic living environment for your dog by regularly cleaning their living space and washing pet utilities.   Dog Vaccination FAQs Q1: Does vaccinating a dog guarantee immunity protection? A1: Dog vaccination significantly reduces the risk of diseases. Vaccines offer immunity protection for dogs, but there is still a very small chance of infection.   Q2: Are all dogs suitable for vaccination? A2: Most dogs are suitable for preventive vaccination. However, in some special circumstances (such as pregnancy or illness), the veterinarian will assess whether vaccination is appropriate based on the specific situation.   Q3: What are some common infectious diseases in dogs? A3: Common infectious diseases in dogs include rabies, canine pneumonia, infectious canine hepatitis, canine distemper, and canine viral enteritis. These diseases can pose significant health threats to dogs.

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Cat Vaccinations
13 December 2023
Cat Vaccination: Vaccination and Types
Whether you are a first-time cat owner or not, getting your cat vaccinated is a crucial responsibility. These vaccines help prevent various diseases, ensuring your cats can enjoy a healthy life.   Why Should Be My Cat Vaccinated? Vaccinating your cat strengthens their immune system and enabling your cat to fight against a range of illnesses. Therefore, getting your cat vaccinated is a key to protect them from disease.   Types of Cat Vaccines and Preventable Diseases Although there are no legal requirements in Hong Kong for cat vaccinations, it is highly recommended for the well-being of your cat.   FVRCP (Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, and Panleukopenia): This vaccine protects against three common infectious diseases, including feline viral rhinotracheitis, feline calicivirus, and feline panleukopenia. Rabies Vaccine: It prevents cats from contracting rabies.   Vaccination Schedule for Cats The timing and frequency of vaccination vary depending on the vaccine type and the age of cats.   FVRCP Vaccine Kittens typically receive their first core vaccine shot at two months old, followed by boosters every month until they are four months old. Afterward, revaccination is required every one to three years. For adult cats, the initial core vaccine shot is followed by a booster after one month. After these two shots, revaccination is necessary every three years.   Rabies Vaccine The specific injection plan and timing for rabies vaccine should be discussed with your veterinarian based on individual circumstances.   Daily Preventive Measures for Cat’s Health In addition to vaccination, taking daily preventive measures is crucial for ensuring your pet's health. Here are some common preventive measures:   Annual Health Check: Schedule regular veterinary health check to monitor your cat's overall health, including comprehensive physical examination, dental evaluation and general deworming. Regular Grooming: Regularly brush your cat's fur to remove shed hair and parasites. Clean Environment: Maintain a clean and hygienic living environment for your cat by regularly cleaning their living space and washing pet utilities.   Cat Vaccination FAQs Q1: Does vaccinating a cat guarantee immunity protection? A1: Cat vaccination significantly reduces the risk of diseases. Vaccines offer immunity protection for cats, but there is still a very small chance of infection.   Q2: My cat stays indoors and doesn't go outside. Is vaccination necessary? A2: Even if your cat is strictly indoors, it is still recommended to get them vaccinated. Kittens can be born with infections from the mother, or they can contact viruses through environmental exposure. Vaccination greatly reduces the chances of illness.   Q3: Are all cats suitable for vaccination? A3: Most cats are suitable for preventive vaccination. However, in some special circumstances (such as pregnancy or illness), the veterinarian will assess whether vaccination is appropriate based on the specific situation.    

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Pet Desexing
12 December 2023
Desexing Your Pet
Pet desexing is an important topic that revolves around love and health. As pet owners, we often overlook one of the most basic aspects of pet care - getting our pets desexed. With the progress of society, it is crucial to have a clear understanding of the significance of desexing and the positive impact on pets.   Basic Concept of Pet Desexing Pet desexing involves surgically removing a portion or all of the reproductive organs. For female animals, this entails the removal of the uterus and ovaries, while for male animals, it involves the removal of the testicles. It is a routine surgery typically performed under general anesthesia, and pets usually recover quickly from the procedure.   Benefits of Desexing Your Pet First and foremost, desexing provides significant health benefits for pets. This procedure can greatly reduce the risk of prostate, testicular, uterine, and mammary gland diseases and cancers in cats and dogs. It is a preventive measure that enables pets to live longer and healthier lives.   Pet desexing also helps to effectively reduce the behavioral issue of urine marking in cats and dogs. This behavior not only troubles the owners but can also lead to household conflicts. Desexed pets are usually more docile and less prone to conflicts with other animals, further reducing aggression.   Unneutered male dogs that are kept indoors for long periods may redirect their energy towards furniture or even humans. Such behavior affects the relationship within the family and with the pet. Desexing can effectively reduce such undesirable behaviors, making the household more harmonious.   Unspayed female dogs will be on heat approximately twice a year, and during this time, they may attract attention and encounters. This not only causes inconvenience for pet owners but also increases the risk of accidental pregnancies. Desexing can prevent such situations and also helps prevent physical and behavioral changes caused by pseudopregnancy.     Will Pet Desex Lead to Weight Issues? Some people are concerned that desexing may increase the risk of obesity in pets. However, if pets receive a balanced diet and regular exercise, desex itself does not increase the risk of obesity. On the contrary, desex can reduce the risk of certain gender-related diseases, allowing pets to enjoy a healthier life.   How Much Does Pet Desexing Cost? The cost of pet desexing surgery varies depending on the type, size, and gender of the animal. However, compared to the care of related medical expenses, the cost of desexing is reasonable and cost-effective.   When is the Right Time to Get Cats and Dogs Desexed? Both cats and dogs can be desexed at around five to six months of age since they can start reproducing at this age. Early desex not only helps to control the pet population but also reduces the discomfort experienced by pets during their on heat cycles.   If you have any questions about pet desexing surgery, feel free to contact us for more detailed information and to schedule an appointment. Pet desexing is not only an expression of love for your furry companions but also a contribution to society and your family. Let us work together to promote the health of our pets.  

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Cat Deworming
12 December 2023
Cat Deworming
Preventing Infections and Transmissions Many pet owners often wonder if their cats need to be dewormed. In fact, cats frequently get infected with parasites, especially when they are young. Therefore, regular deworming for cats is crucial to effectively eliminate intestinal parasites, fleas, ticks, and heartworms, ensuring the health of your cat and reducing the risk of human infection.   Primary Transmission Routes of Parasites   Maternal Transmission: When a mother cat carries parasites during pregnancy, these parasites can be passed on to the kittens through the placenta.   Transmission during Nursing: If the mother cat has parasites, she can also transmit them to the kittens during nursing.   Environmental Cleanliness: Regularly clean the areas where your cat spends time. After rain, it is important to remove excessive water outside to prevent mosquito breeding.   Ingesting Infected Fleas: Cats can ingest infectious eggs or larvae while eating or drinking water.   If a cat becomes infected with parasites, it may exhibit symptoms such as gastrointestinal discomfort, coughing, weakness, weight loss, anemia, or bloating in kittens. If you notice any of these symptoms or suspect your cat is infected, seek veterinary care. Additionally, regular deworming can help prevent parasite infections.   Methods of Deworming Cats   There are various deworming products available on the market, each with different usage instructions:   Oral Treatment: Kittens should be dewormed monthly until they are six months old, and then every three months to six months for cats over six months.   Topical Spot-On Treatments: Apply a deworming treatment once a month. Tidy up cat's hair to expose the skin and apply the treatment between the shoulder blades. The medication will gradually penetrate the skin.   If you have any questions about deworming your cat, consult your veterinarian for guidance and follow their instructions.   Additionally, there are some daily measures you can take to help protect your cat from parasite infestations:   Regular Health Check: Schedule regular veterinary health check, including parasite screenings, to detect and treat parasite infections early.   Maintain a Clean Environment: Regularly clean your cat's bedding, litter box, and scratching posts to reduce the chance of parasite infestation.   Avoid Contact with Infected Animals: Avoid allowing your cat to come into contact with infected animals, especially stray cats or dogs.  

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Post 10 - Signs of Illness in your pets -  30 Apr 2022
8 November 2023
Signs of Illness in Your Pets
Dogs and cats are excellent at pretending everything is fine, even when they are sick. The signs of illness are often very subtle, so you have to watch them closely. If you do notice anything abnormal, don’t rely on books or websites for a diagnosis. Contact your vet immediately.   Symptoms to watch for Diarrhea Repeated vomiting Refusal to eat over 24 hours Excessive thirst and urination Red or swollen gums Difficulty urinating - IF YOUR PET CANNOT URINATE, THAT IS AN EMERGENCY! Runny nose and eyes Itchy skin Progressive weight loss Tiredness
   Frequent veterinary appointments and close monitoring at home can help detect diseases in their earlier stages, when they are the most treatable. For enquiries or bookings, please do not hesitate to contact VEC at 2334-2334.

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General Hotline: 2334-2334

24Hr Emergency Hotline: 6828-6620

 

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